GoPro Hero 3 Black Edition: White knuckles never looked so good

I drove a Harley around Europe recently and had a particularly eventful journey crossing the Great St Bernard Pass, one of the best classic mountain road experiences you’ll ever get in Europe. It was, it has to be said, the perfect opportunity to put my helmet mounted  Hero Go Pro through its paces, and thankfully for me I didn’t need to go back and repeat the feat, the Hero lived up to its name in a heroic sort of way delivering some pretty sharp on the move video footage.

GoPro-HD-Hero-3

The new Hero 3 version however is a different story altogether. It’s 30% smaller and 25% lighter than its predecessor (very welcome when its bolted on top of your head) and waterproof up to 60m. But the real genius of the Hero is in the visuals:  this generation can capture ultra-wide angle HD video  in various degrees of clarity depending on how meaty your SD card happens to be. 60 fps at 1080p 48 fps at 1440p, 120 fps at 720p, 30 fps at 2.7Kp  and 15 fps 4Kp. Whilst 15 frames per second is not what you would class as cinema quality, it is described as the world’s first 4K capable action cam, so there.

For me though, the real benefit is in the much improved stills department. The GoPro 3  can capture 12MP photos at an impressive rate of 30 photos per second, more than enough to recreate that adrenaline high you got from that snowboard leap, or passing by those snoozers on the black downhill run.

There’s  built-in Wi-Fi  so you can stream footage to your mobile media, GoPro App compatibility, and the Wi-Fi Remote which is normally a £79.99 accessory is included in the package.

With budget considerations a factor, there are also more modest silver and white editions available, The GoPro Hero 3 will make those action packed days even more heroic.

The HERO3: Black Edition £379.99, HERO3: Silver Edition £279.99 and the HERO3: White Edition £179.99.

www.GoPro.com

Liquid Image Ego action camera: For “Dude! Did you see that?” moments

I’ve dabbled in various “extreme” sports over the years, with varying degrees of failure, be in parkour, tricking, BMX or trials biking. One thing that has been consistent has been excited faces breathlessly uttering “Did you see that?” after a particularly stunning jump, trick or movement. There’s something in extreme sports that appeals to the extrovert and it’s great to be able to capture your latest feat and show it to friends, family or anyone who’s attention you can grab.

Ego-Cameras

Catering to this desire, Liquid Image have launched the new Ego camera, a small (4.1 x 3 x 6.4cm) mountable HD video camera. Wearable tech is “the next big thing” and Liquid Image already make a pretty cool assortment of google-mounted cameras for POV recording underwater (or on the slopes).

The Ego comes with a range of accessories and can be strapped to chests, heads, helmets, bikes, boards and … well you get the idea. The Ego includes a multi-directional mounting system with a quick release lever, tripod mount.There’s even underwater housing, waterproof down to 100m.

As for the actual camera it records in Full HD 1080p video at 30 fps; HD 720p video at 60 fps (good for fast action or post-production slow motion); 12-megapixel still photo; and a continuous Photo mode. The lens itself is a 136 degrees wide angle, but you can set it to slightly narrower angle if that’s your bag.

However the Ego isn’t just a camera, or even just an action camera. It’s a smart action camera. Holding one of the little buttons on top for a few seconds creates a wireless network that you can connect your smartphone to. Via the magic of apps you can preview footage on your smartphone or tablet – useful for composing shots as there’s no built-in display on the unit itself. Even better you can remotely control the unit from your smartphone, which is great if you’ve mounted it somewhere visually fascinating but hard to reach.

The Ego is available in five colours, Black, Red, Blue, White and Yellow and has an RRP of £159.99. It will be available in the UK from August 2012.

Lights, Camera, Action – The best action cameras available

Capturing the terrifying yet exciting concoction of feelings produced by participating in extreme sports on camera is priceless, but naturally requires an extremely durable and rugged piece of equipment. Action Cam (pictured) that features standard definition action thrills for only £24.99. If you are looking for something a bit more high-end however, latestgadgets have come up with the most dependable photographic companion to accompany those crazy enough to take part in such white-knuckle, adrenaline-pumping sports.

Action-Head-Cam

Oregon Scientific ATC9K HD Video Camera
Designed solely with extreme sport enthusiasts in mind, the new ATC9K has both a G-sensor and GPS module crammed into its interior, allowing tracking and recording of the geographical and physical aspects of thrill-seekers escapades, and not merely the visual.

Recognizing the difficulty of switching a camera onto play mode when you are hurtling down the side of a mountain, Oregon Scientific have included a one button recording feature and a laser pointer to line up the action, regardless of the precarious places the ATC9K might be attached to. Weighing 160g, the ATC9K is shock resistant and waterproof for up to 20 meters, but manages to retain an attractive exterior despite being such a sturdy device. The camera takes five mega-pixel photos and records up to 1080p of high-definition video.

The ATC9K costs £249.99, which includes mounting accessories. GPS plug-in can bought for an extra £49.99.

Drift HD170
Pioneered by Drift, the HD170 is similar to the ATC9K, in providing 5 mega-pixel photos and 1080p, 720 or WVGA high-definition video settings. But what is particularly favourable with this action camera compared to many others on the market is that users can benefit from a 170-degree wide-angle lens, which we presume gives the camera its name. The lens can be rotated at a 300 degree angle, optimizing the field view of the action.

Other features to make life easier for the adrenaline junkies amongst us includes RF remote saves batteries, memory and edit time by making it easy to shoot briefer clips. The RF remote also starts and stops recording safely to avoid the possibility of brawling with the camera on the go. A 4X Digital zoom also enables the HD170 to get closer to the action.
The Drift HD170 is more expensive at £329.99, which we assume is because of its rather special lens.

GoPro HD Helmet Hero 1080P
Marketed as being the world’s first true 1080p HD wearable camera with 30 frames per second recording, the HD Helmet Hero 1080P capitalizes on resolution, clarity and realism – the essence behind the reasons of employing an action camera.
The wider the field of view is with wearable cameras the better, to allow extreme sportsmen and women to visualise not only their own personal techniques but the techniques of rivals. With a 1280x960p resolution the HD Helmet Hero gives users the largest field of view of any wearable camera.

This GoPro wearable camera has protective waterproof casing, which not only protects the camera from the most aggressive of journeys but is also waterproof up to 60 meters under water, some 40 more than the ATC9K, making it a firm favourite for deep sea divers.

Retailing at £299.99 the GoPro HD Helmet Hero 1080P is reasonably priced, although without any viewfinder, knowing what you are filming may prove difficult.