Galaxy-Tab-7-point-7

Samsung Galaxy Tab 7.7 Review

Galaxy-Tab-7-point-7

It seemed everyone thought a lot of the original Galaxy Tablet when it first came out; there were even (shush) whispers that it might have been a device to at least offer some faint resistance to the iPad World Takeover. Unfortunately it was blighted by the fact it only ran Android 2.2 which was really designed for handsets, thus the Tab 7 quickly looked dated. Fortunately, the whizz-kids in the gilded halls of Samsung Towers have sorted that out for the release of the 7.7 and fixed it up with Android 3.2, the rather quaintly named Honeycomb.

The screen is (somewhat fittingly) 7.7 inches long, a conveniently compact screen for the weary Facebook-hungry traveller, and a world away from the 10.1 tablet that Samsung have been hawking recently. It’s a Super AMOLED plus display, which Samsung make great play of and so they should with its 1280 x 800 megapixels allowing the machine to deliver what they somewhat bashfully describe in their press release as “brilliant, high-contrast colours and a beautiful, crisp viewing experience.” Fortunately, reception for the screen of the 7.7- which was revealed at the IFA 2011 conference in Berlin last week- has backed up the companies grandiose claims with all hands-on parties at the IFA giving it the thumbs up.

Underneath the bonnet the machine packs a pretty-good 1.4 GHz dual core processor, which we are promised will allow for super fast web-loading and navigation, program multi-tasking and high-quality video and audio playback. Due to the machine having the delicious Honeycomb, the whole internet experience should be much improved, with options such as multiple-tabbing and Flash capabilities allowing for a much vastly superior web-surfing experience to that which owners of the Tab 7 had. It will also give access to the Android Apps store. On a similar note, the 7.7 also gives access to Samsung’s Hub Services, which offer Games, Music and Books to owners to access. With over 15 million songs, 2.3 million, 2,000 newspapers and 3,000 magazines this will be a real boon for anyone who doesn’t yet own a DS, IPod or Kindle.

Aesthetically, it’s a treat; like that lovely Elle Macpherson the 7.7 it really is all about the body. Ultra slick with aluminium casing, dimensions of just 196.7x133x7.89mm and a bird-like weight off just 335g, it’ll slip into the most titchy of palms. Samsung claim that despite these diminutive measurements the battery life of the 7.7 will not be affected, and that it can offer 10 hours of video playback time, though there is of course a chance that this may well be a load of codswallop.

Regardless it’s a sound offering and, whilst the chances of any of these machines ever usurping the iPad in the wider consciousness are essentially zero, is does show that for those out there not always enamoured with Apple there are now viable alternatives